Archives for posts with tag: Personal growth

This past January I made a new years resolution: a commitment to myself and to my writing.

I’ve been writing the same two-book series for the last five or so years. Sad as that may seem, I’ve grown exponentially as a writer doing it. My story has been cultivated, evolved, and has never been better than what it is right now. I’ve written, rewritten, and restarted. This past January I promised myself that I wouldn’t everdo that again. I would never again open a fresh Word document and start my story from scratch.

I would write my story at a bare minimum for fifteen minutes a day. Extra minutes in one day wouldn’t carry over as credit to the next. But 0 minutes today would mean the added minutes tomorrow.

This year so far I have written a minimum (and I know there’s been countless more hours added to my daily fifteen minutes that has to go uncounted) of 72 hours and 15 minutes. I owe myself another two hours and fifteen minutes as of today.

Taken that other writing, i.e., blog posts, short stories, Worth1000 contests, other stories, essays, and any other type of writing I do on a daily basis do not count towards that fifteen minutes. These minutes are a dedication to my story, not just to my writing.

I’m getting there on top of school, running, family, friends, hobbies, being a University student, homework… the list of my life goes on.

And I have more going on than this two book series that’s been brewing in my head since middle school. But I’ve made a special commitment to it, and it’s stuck.

I have a passion for writing, and I dedicated myself to it. I’ve grown more this year as a writer than any other. Part of that are the diverse outlets I’ve written in. Part of that is practice. Another part is hard work.

Mostly, it’s the 72 hours and fifteen minutes.

Every time we struggle through something difficult we change a little; an alteration here, an adjustment there. It’s a process that gives us substance and texture. We learn from our mistakes, and we grow and change. That being said, if someone has never made a mistake then they have never grown. Therefore they must be a rather boring individual.

This is why I don’t find the people with a whole lot of static personal issues and self-doubt very interesting. They’re stuck in limbo; cast there by their own problems and unable to figure their way out of it. Sometimes staying stuck there is self-destruction. These are the people that play the victim. Regardless of ones own responsibilities or personal mistakes, problems are always someone else’s fault. Surely of course, they are merely the victim in this situation.

In truth, I find that the people who are most comfortably situated in life behave oppositely to this. They are the ones who have figured out how to deal with their issues in life in their own way.They accept their mistakes and their responsibilities, and they do something about them. Not to say that they’ve gotten over their problems or that they don’t have any. But instead that they’ve moved past them, or learned how to live with and through their issues.

Everyone has problems, but not everyone can deal with theirs. The people who do, (and I think of this more as a procress and not an achievement) are the people who are the most interesting. It’s because they’ve innovated themselves more. They’ve learned how not to be the victim of the negative, but rather an active individual in the positive, despite the negative. As a result, they’re the most changed individual and not the most ragged.

These are the people that I strive to meet. I cherish their experiences as I come to find out how they figured growth out: because that process is different for everyone. And we can learn from people who’ve done it. Even though in the end we might, and probably will, do it entirely differently.

That is to say, emotions may be universal but dealing with them isn’t. And figuring out how to deal is essential.